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Livestock grazing, income source, career inherited by Afrin residents

RODEI IZED KHALO-GHANDI ALO

AFRIN – Some villages in Afrin are known for their livestock. A large proportion of the villagers depend on sheep grazing, which is an important source of income for them.EFR-CINDIRESE-KEDIKIRINA-PEZ (1)

The pastures of grazing pass from one generation to another among the shepherds, where they are similar in their different styles in their times. They leave their flocks, which vary from one shepherd to another. By autumn, the shepherd moves to the land, dense with grass, to graze them. The pasture is for livestock owners with a limited wage until the herd is finished grazing.

Due to the importance of livestock in rural life, which is considered to be the 2nd most important source of income for the people after agriculture, a large proportion of the rural population in rural Afrin depends on grazing sheep.

“I work in grazing and raising animals, not only me, but my wife and my children also help me in this. Livestock has an important role to play in our lives as a source of income, where cattle herds have been raised in the region since ancient times like sheep, goats, and cows” said Khalil Rashid, a resident of Baflour village of Jindreissa area.

The grazing culture has extends to the people of Afrin canton for hundreds of years. They inherited it from their predecessores. This is evident in the passage through the countryside. Where this habit has been inherited since ancient times and it is still ongoing so far as a major source of income in every home.EFR-CINDIRESE-KEDIKIRINA-PEZ (3)

“Grazing is the main source of income. We depend mainly on grazing on economic income. We use milk derivatives such as milk, kuresh, cheese, cream, milk balls and cooked milk,” he said. Doperkeh”

According to Rashid, sometimes when they do not have the money, they are forced to sell the sheep and make use of the money. They also benefit from sheep’s milk in caring for their children.

In spring, shepherds go to farmland or grasses on the road sides to keep the amount of milk produced by sheep, or to buy grass in agricultural land for a fee to graze herds in it.

In winter, they feed the herd with fodder, but the fact that the fodder has become expensive due to the traders’ monopoly, they buy it in summer because the feed is usually cheap and therefore they buy the fodder in winter with small quantities if needed.

(H/S)

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